Minggu, 26 Juli 2009

[] Americas Coffee Culture Enters the New Java Millenium

has posted a new item, 'Americas Coffee Culture Enters the New Java Millenium'

The American coffee craze enters the new millenium. As I sip my extra hot,
nonfat vanilla latte I realize that my Chico State University days are now just
a faded, distant memory. Seven years have passed and the late night cramming
sessions while sipping tepid mochas served by vapid-looking grungesters in Caf
Maxx are just a hazy blur. I am now entering the New Java Millenium.
Recently, I thought about my most favorite research paper I wrote in college. I
was an American Studies minor and for an American I wrote about Americas Coffee
Culture. The project still burns brightly in my caffeinated brain. Whats
happened to Americas coffee culture? I am slowly realizing that America has
entered the Millenium and the java culture has boomed without me. As we move
into the 00s, Americas coffee culture literally spills into our every day lives.
The most recent jab at the modern coffee scene was depicted in the campy,
independent mock-u-mentary film, Best in Show. A whiny, yuppie couple details
how they met at Starbucks. Actually, he frequented one Starbucks while she
clacked away on her laptop at the Starbucks across the street. The hilarious
dialogue of their soy latte whipped frappes and extra hot double capps made me
laugh. Best in Shows satirical diatribe on Starbucks accurately depicts coffee
culture influence amongst Millenium suburbanites. Not only am I a certifiable
java junkie but I make it a point of observing other java addicts in their
natural habitats: lurking in coffeehouses and other eateries where a cup of joe
is the beverage of choice. As a teenager, I thought coffee was for older
people. As I stare vacantly ahead in line at Starbucks, I watch in amazement as
Britney Spears-esque girls order double espressos and then shoot them down
without batting an eye. Didnt their parents warn them that coffee stunts their
growth? I guess not. I didnt know teenagers were drinking coffee these days.
Although, there are still many tried and true coffee drinkers that stick with
their Maxwell House and instant Folgers and steer clear of froofy drinks, as my
father affectionately coins espresso drinks. My dad would be one of the
lingering breeds of black coffee drinkers. Although, my dad has caught up with
the java elite and he now frequents Starbucks on a regular basis. Even my
father has given into the Milleniums coffee culture. The other coffee
phenomenon that is catching on quickly is the cyber caf. You can grab a latte
and then catch up with your email. The conception of the cyber caf depicts where
our fast-paced, techno-culture is taking us: where two addictions (coffee and
the Internet) are coupled together in the most sinful of relationships. The
marketing concept is brilliant and appeals to those who need to satiate both
addictions in one quick fix. The other fascinating trend that reflects our
current culture is the obsession with healthy coffee alternatives. My mother is
a prime example. She is very health-conscious and has to watch her dairy
intake. Her favorite concoction is a decaffeinated soy latte. Soy? When I was
in college, soy wasnt even invented (well, it was but I think it was used to
feed livestock). With the influx of Americas healthy habits, coffee
establishments offer milk substitutes such as soymilk. Also organic,
chemical-free coffee beans are sold and served in coffeehouses which again
reflects Americas health consciousness. As my caffeine buzz fades and I log on
to my computer, I reminisce and try to conjure up the good old days of Americas
coffee cultureah, when a mocha was a mocha and Starbucks was a new concept. It
looks like I need to wake up, grab my soy latte, and join Americas coffee
culture at the cyber cafes. Welcome to the New Java Millenium. About the
AuthorTherese Pope is a non-profiteer fundraiser by day and a freelance writer
and poet by night. Her works have been published in various e-zines and
literary anthologies. She is a yoga fiend with a penchant for writing with
latte in hand. She resides in Sacramento, Calif. - Bare root plants are easy to
handle. They are usually dormant perennials, shrubs, or trees that have been
harvested from the field, have had the soil washed from their roots and then
have been stored in refrigeration for later shipment. "Bare rooting" a plant is
a safe, proven, and much used means of storing and shipping many garden plants.
At Cottage Farms we always recommend that you plant bare root plants as soon as
possible, but you can hold them in a refrigerator, unheated garage, or cellar
for a short period if necessary. The best time of year for planting bare root
plants in the garden is during the winter (if the soil is not frozen) or spring.
The arrival of warmer temperatures and longer days cause the plants to wake up
naturally from their winter dormancy and help insure gardening success.
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Daylilies: Cottage Farms suggests choosing a garden area that will receive at
least four hours of direct sun each day. Spade or roto-till the intended flower
bed to a depth of at least 8-10 inches. If you do not have good garden soil, you
may want to blend in a generous portion of dehydrated manure, compost, peat
moss, or shredded leaves, but daylilies are one of the easiest to grow and most
forgiving plants in any garden. Dig holes at least twice as wide and deep as
the bare root divisions. Fashion a small cone-shaped mound of dirt in the center
of the hole below ground level. Spread the roots over the mound with no more
than 1" of soil covering the crown (where the leaves and roots meet). For
daylilies with emerging green growth plant any new growth above ground level.
Firm the soil around the crown of the plant. Cottage Farms always recommends
mulching immediately since mulch shades and cools the soil, helps prevent weeds
and provides organic matter for the soil. Water your plants thoroughly after
mulching. Daylilies grow best with at least 1-inch of rain (or equivalent
watering) each week, but are quite drought tolerant. As soon as new growth
emerges begin fertilizing every two weeks with Cottage Farms "Carefree
Bud-N-Bloom Booster" throughout the growing season. This will help ensure
maximum flowering and root development.
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Trees and Shrubs: First, look the plant over and remove (prune) any broken or
damaged limbs or roots. Cottage Farms recommends soaking the roots of the tree
or shrub in a bucket of water for 2 to 3 hours prior to planting. When ready for
planting, select a site suitable for the plant and dig a hole larger than the
roots are wide when they are spread out. If you are planting in poor or clay
soils, you may want to mix compost, dehydrated manure, peat moss or shredded
leaves with you excavated soil (if you do so, you may have extra soil when you
complete the planting - remove excess soil, never pile it against the stem or
plant too deep) . In the bottom of the hole form a cone shaped mound of soil.
Place the plant's roots over the mound of soil and spread them evenly around the
mound. Before filling the hole with soil make sure the trees existing soil line
will be even with the new ground level. Begin filling the hole with soil,
carefully firming the soil around the roots, leaving no air pockets. When the
hole is approximately ? full of soil fill the hole with water and let it soak
in. Once the water has soaked in make sure the tree is standing straight and
finish filling the hole with soil. Form a saucer shaped rim around the outside
of the hole. This will allow water to stay within the planting area. To assist a
tree or tall shrub in getting anchored, you may want to stake it. As always,
Cottage Farms suggests a 2-4-inch layer of mulch around the planting area to
promote moisture retention, maintain even soil temperatures, and to discourage
weed growth. Water the new transplant generously once every week throughout its
first growing season. In later years, at least 1-inch of rain or watering
equivalent per week is recommended for most soils. As soon as new growth emerges
begin fertilizing every two weeks with Cottage Farms "Carefree Bud-N-Bloom
Booster" throughout the growing season. This will help ensure maximum flowering
and root development.
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Roses: Prior to planting remove (prune off) any broken roots or canes. Cottage
Farms suggests soaking the entire rose plant (roots and canes) for at least 1-2
hours in luke-warm water. Select a location that receives at least four hours of
sun each day. Spade or roto-till the intended rose bed to a depth of 12-15
inches. Unless you have good garden soil, Cottage Farms suggest you blend in a
generous portion of dehydrated manure, compost, peat moss, or shredded leaves.
This will help improve drainage and aeration. Dig a hole at least twice as wide
and deep as the bare roots. Partially fill the hole with the soil mix, making a
cone shaped mound in the center of the hole over which to drape the roots.
Adjust the height of the mound so the graft union is at the correct level. In
warmer climates a rose should be planted so the bud union (a bulge on the stem
of the rose plant indicating where the rose plant has been grafted onto the
roots) is at or slightly above ground level. In colder climates, the union may
be planted up to 2" below ground level to help reduce the chance for winter
die-back. Spread the roots out evenly over the cone shaped mound. Holding the
rose at the correct planting depth, fill the hole with soil, working it
carefully around the roots. When the hole is approximately ? full of soil, fill
the hole with water and let it soak in. Once the water has soaked into the soil,
make sure the rose is standing straight up and finish filling the hole. Form a
saucer shaped rim around the outside of the hole. This will allow water to stay
within the planting area. Cottage Farms always suggests a 2-4-inch layer of
mulch around the planting area to promote moisture retention, maintain even soil
temperatures, and to discourage weed growth. Roses require at least 1-inch of
rain (or equivalent watering) each week. As soon as new growth emerges begin
fertilizing every two weeks with Cottage Farms "Carefree Bud-N-Bloom Rose
Booster" throughout the growing season. This will help ensure maximum flowering
and root development.
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Irises and other Rhizomes: Select a good location for the plants being planted
in your garden. Irises do well in full sun or partial shade. Spade or roto-till
the intended flower bed to a depth of 8-10-inches. If your garden soil poor or
is a heavy clay, Cottage Farms suggest you blend in a generous portion of
dehydrated manure, compost, peat moss, or shredded leaves into the soil. Dig
holes at least twice as wide and deep as the rhizome. Fashion a cone shaped
mound of soil in the center of the hole below ground level. Spread the roots
over the mound with the top of the rhizome at ground level or slightly exposed.
A common mistake is planting Iris rhizomes to deep. Firm in the soil around the
rhizome with your fingers and water thoroughly. Cottage Farms always suggests a
2-4-inch layer of mulch around the planting area to promote moisture retention,
maintain even soil temperatures, and to discourage weed growth. Iris perform
best with at least 1-inch of rain (or equivalent watering) each week. As soon as
new growth emerges begin fertilizing every two weeks with Cottage Farms
"Carefree Bud-N-Bloom Booster" throughout the growing season. This will ensure
maximum flowering and root development. Cottage Farms Direct Check us out at
http://www.cottagefarmsdirect.com Click here to determine your hardiness zone:
http://www.cottagefarmsdirect.com/hardiness.asp About the Author None

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